Recipe Index – Sub Tropic Cookery

“Did you know I receive more fan mail weekly than does Marilyn Monroe? … she is now receiving only 80 or so letters a week, while mine runs at least double that!” — Alex D. Hawkes (1962)

Don’t forget Alex’s advice…

“It is not, though, necessary nor obligatory to restrict the offering of this drink to this time of the year. By using the following recipe, Egg Nog can be presented with pride all year round. Try it soon, for your next festive home get-together.” – Alex D. Hawkes – The Rum Cookbook (1972)

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“A World of Vegetable Cookery is a result of combining my interests in botany and cooking over a number of years. My researches on my particular botanical specialties- orchids, palms, bromeliads, and certain other groups of plants have taken me to many parts of the globe. Everywhere I have traveled I have had the opportunity to note the good things that appear from the kitchen or campfire.” – Alex D. Hawkes (1968)

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What is Sub-Tropic Cookery? Who was botanist & cookbook author Alex D. Hawkes, from Coconut Grove?

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2016/12/10/what-is-sub-tropic-cookery/

Holiday Shopping in 1967? Cookbook South Florida Cookery (1964) by Alex D. Hawkes now at all bookstores!

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2016/12/11/holiday-shopping-in-1967-cookbook-south-florida-cookery-1964-by-alex-d-hawkes-now-in-stores/

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He Cooks With Florida Foods

Chicken Coconut Grove: Chicken à la King Baked Inside Coconuts!

Chicken Coconut Grove - Alex D. Hawkes
Chicken Coconut Grove: Chicken à la King Baked Inside Coconuts!

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2016/12/10/chicken-coconut-grove/

Egg Nog Is Also For New Year’s Eve… Or The Entire Year!

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Enjoy Egg Nog All Year Round

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2016/12/27/egg-nog-is-also-for-new-years-eve/

Take Full Advantage Of Kumquat Season – Preserved Kumquats

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“Allow kumquats to stand in syrup overnight. Next day, bring fruit and syrup back to the boiling point.” – Hawkes (1967)

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/take-full-advantage-of-kumquat-season/

Indonesian Recipes At Home In Florida – Tomatoes Javanese

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“The marvelous and varied cuisine of far-off Indonesia offers many suggestions for us here in Florida. These recipes are quite unlike those of any other Eastern cookery – some Javanese dishes are frighteningly spicy-hot, for example. Yet I often use them in combination with good old American meals to excellent advantage.” – Alex D. Hawkes

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2017/01/17/indonesian-recipes-at-home-in-florida/

Even Papaya’s Leaves Are Tasty… Breakfast Papaya at “The Kampong” with Dr. & Mrs. David Fairchild

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Breakfast Papaya at The Kampong

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2017/02/01/even-papayas-leaves-are-tasty-breakfast-at-the-kampong-with-dr-mrs-david-fairchild/

The Kampong… A Home on The Edge of the Tropics – Kampong Date Chews

Kampong Date Chew
“Dr. Fairchild’s experiences with dates and the almost insurmountable difficulties he had trying to introduce them here are well known to readers of his marvelous books.” – Alex D. Hawkes

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2017/05/01/the-kampong-a-home-on-the-edge-of-the-tropics-kampong-date-chews/

It’s Season To Serve The Delicious Avocado – Brazilian Avocado Cream

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It’s Season To Serve The Delicious Avocado – Brazilian Avocado Cream “Originally from Mexico and Central America, botanists know the avocado as a member of the laurel family, and have records showing that the Aztecs made extensive use of it long before the arrival of Columbus on our shores.” – Alex D. Hawkes (1963)

https://subtropiccookery.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/its-season-to-serve-the-delicious-avocado-brazilian-avocado-cream/

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It’s Season To Serve The Delicious Avocado – Brazilian Avocado Cream

“Originally from Mexico and Central America, botanists know the avocado as a member of the laurel family, and have records showing that the Aztecs made extensive use of it long before the arrival of Columbus on our shores.” – Alex D. Hawkes (1963)

Avocado It's SEASON Title Hawkes

As avocado season is upon us here in South Florida let’s delight ourselves with some freshly made Avocado Ice Cream. What could be finer in the summer, wherever you may be? Both a fruit and vegetable, the Avocado (Persea americana, of the Laurel Family), also regarded as Alligator Pear, was once a foreigner in Florida. Let’s see what Dr. David Fairchild over at The Kampong in Coconut Grove has to say about Alligator Pears.

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Dr. David Fairchild at his typewriter in his Laboratory at The Kampong in Coconut Grove, FL.
“As I sit here at my typewriter and let my mind sweep back over the days which I have spent in the state of Florida, I discover what an impossible task it is to give anything but a most distorted picture of that past. Even the common words which I will have to use do not carry the meanings which they did at that time. The word Avocado in 1898 when there were none in Florida, except an occasional specimen in some experimenter’s yard, has a very different meaning now from what it had then. Were I writing in those days I would have to begin with the assumption that none of my readers had the faintest idea what an avocado was, for the word itself had not penetrated into the literature of the Floridians. If they knew anything about the avocado it was as an Alligator Pear. Why alligator and why pear are points I have never quite comprehended. They illustrate what I wish to bring out however, viz. that the so called “things” of history are merely symbols and that it is with these symbols and not with the things that History is mainly concerned.” – Dr. David Fairchild – The Kampong – Coconut Grove, FL. (1942) TEQUESTA
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FOR GOURMETS ONLY (Miami Herald) Recipes by Alex Hawkes
“The avocado is one of those wonderful tropical delicacies which can be classed either as a fruit or as a vegetable, depending upon how it is used.”
“Though its origins date back to pre-Columbian times in Mexico and Guatemala, today the finest avocados in the world are raised here in South Florida, where their commercial production falls into the category of big business.”
“Through the development of new early-bearing varieties, our avocado season is now almost nine months of the year, certainly a record for a tropical fruit!” – Alex D. Hawkes
Avocado Botany Hawkes
“Originally from Mexico and Central America, botanists know the avocado as a member of the laurel family, and have records showing that the Aztecs made extensive use of it long before the arrive of Columbus on our shores.” – Alex D. Hawkes (1963)
Avocado Enjoy Tropical Treats Hawkes
Enjoy These Tropical Treats

And here’s Alex’s Brazilian Avocado Cream, which can be adapted with various creams and nut based milks to suit your needs, experiment, let us know, surely Alex wouldn’t object. Enjoy.

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Avocados Came From Mexico … they’re members of laurel family

Hawkes Brazilian Avocado Cream

Brazilian Avocado Cream

“In Brazil, the avocado is known as abacate, and is a favorite ingredient in menus, whether simple or ornate. Here is a wonderful dessert from a cidade maravilhosa, Rio de Janeiro.” – Alex D. Hawkes (1968)

2 large, very ripe avocados

2 to 3 tablespoons of fresh lime juice

1 cup sugar

1/4 cup heavy cream

1/4 teaspoon salt

Press avocado pulp through a sieve or food processor to make a puree. Thoroughly blend in other ingredients. Chill for at least two hours. Serve in a chilled parfait glasses. Serves 4 to 6.

Even Papaya’s Leaves Are Tasty… Breakfast at “The Kampong” with Dr. & Mrs. David Fairchild

“The papaya is one of the tropics’ most extraordinary plants. It is not a tree despite its appearance, but rather a woody herbaceous plant, one of the fastest growing species known.” — Alex D. Hawkes

Imagine sitting in a botanical oasis in Coconut Grove, enjoying breakfast papaya, under a Javanese Ficus tree. Not just an ordinary ficus, for this one was planted by the late Dr. David Fairchild, the “Columbus of American Horticulture,” at his Coconut Grove home, “The Kampong”. The seeds were undoubtedly collected during one of his innumerable botanical expeditions around the world. His home, “The Kampong”, is preserved, and still open for one’s amazement and enjoyment. The Fairchild’s Coconut Grove retreat, “The Kampong”, faces the serene Biscayne bay. Let’s reminisce of the Royal Palms (Roystonea regia) that lured the Fairchilds to phone Marian’s parents, and ask them for a loan to secure the property. Marian Hubbard Graham Bell, Dr. Fairchild’s wife, is the daughter of Alexander Graham Bell, who stayed at “The Kampong”, like many other distinguished characters of the time, on several occasions.

“The handsome, big, hand shaped leaves are edible, when boiled in several changes of water, and the late great horticulturist David Fairchild often advocated that all of us eat them regularly, whether at his table in his home, “The Kampong.” Where I lived when I first came to Coconut Grove, or at our own.” —  Alex D. Hawkes

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“The royal palms which so took my fancy when we first saw the place were photographed often in the ‘twenties and ‘thirties, after mangroves had begun to line the canal. But a change in the land level flooded their roots too frequently with saltwater and they perished.” — David Fairchild (1947)

Dr. Fairchild authored books with alluring titles such as,“The World Was My Garden: Travels of a Plant Explorer” (1938), and “The World Grows Round My Door: The Story of The Kampong, a Home on the Edge of the Tropics.” (1947) . These ideals are not easy to claim. Dr. David Fairchild exceeded them by far. Dr. Fairchild introduced over 200,000 plants & varieties of established crops into the United States. He continued to play a pivotal role in the horticultural world during his retirement at “The Kampong”.

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PAPAYA ~ A Tropical Tree Melon ~ On Dr. Fairchild’s desk in his laboratory at “The Kampong” in Coconut Grove.

After Dr. Fairchild left his managerial role with the Department of Plant Introduction program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, D.C., he continued to author occasional botanically inclined papers, & National Geographic articles from his Coconut Grove laboratory. Few people shaped the way the United States eats as much as Dr. Fairchild, having introduced countless culinary staples, such as soybeans, mangos, dates, blueberries, talinum, broccoli and many more, which would be difficult to live without. Fairchild is among the champions we must thank for shaping that way America eats, having introduced countless vegetables often enjoyed, and neglected by children all across the states.

Upon stepping on the soil at “The Kampong”, the Fairchild’s footsteps can be traced by observing the beautiful trees still standing, that they collected, brought home to be planted, introduced, & shared. The word Kampong means “cluster of houses” or “village” in Malay. The Indonesian touches in the garden, adds a subtle contrast, against the backdrop of lovely flora found on the property. When visiting, one can observe the beautiful flowers of the royal poinciana / flamboyant (Delonix regia), from Madagascar. It is the official flowering tree of Miami-Dade County, and was planted by Marian Fairchild at “The Kampong”, in 1917. Marvel over countless mango varieties, as one would expect… palms, aroids, bamboo, ficus, & what seems like an infinite quantity of flowering trees. A mammoth tamarind tree around the vicinity of where Capt. Albion Simmons’ guava grove & factory once stood, prior to Dr. Fairchild purchasing the property. Miami’s first international export, guava jelly sold abroad to Europe, from a then unassuming property in “The Grove”, soon to become “The Kampong”. Wander to corners of the world through the flowers and fruits abound, welcome to “The Kampong”, stay for breakfast will ya?

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“The Kampong” Home of Dr. David & Marian Fairchild in Coconut Grove, Florida.

 

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Papaya plant growing in South Florida. Over 20 feet tall. Fruits weigh several pounds.

Alex D. Hawkes stayed at “The Kampong” with the Fairchilds while still in High School. He was able to enjoy more than an awe inspiring horticultural experience, since there was so much papaya to be enjoyed. Dr. Fairchild returned form the “The Isle of Singing Children”, the island of Siaoe / Siau Island in Indonesia, with a fascinating account of the island’s Papaya-leaf eaters, and its singing children. Fairchild sat with the Radja of Siaoe and his jolly wife who couldn’t “understand why people in other lands eat only their fruits” (Fairchild, 1943). Thank you Alex, for holding onto these recipes and publishing them in The Miami Herald, 18 years after your stay with David & Marian Fairchild  at “The Kampong”. What better way of honoring the late Fairchilds than enjoying some delicious, tropical Papaya? David Fairchild left us in 1954, Marian shortly after in 1962, they both lived their final days at their Coconut Grove oasis.

“The papaya is one of the tropics’ most extraordinary plants. It is not a tree despite its appearance, but rather a woody herbaceous plant, one of the fastest growing species known.” — Alex D. Hawkes

Were you aware that papaya can also be eaten as a vegetable, when green, and freshly picked? Also known as Paw Paw in Jamaica, & Fruta Bomba in Cuba, the “Confused Papaya Is Exotic Herb”, and the source of “papain”, the main ingredient in meat tenderizer. More papaya recipes will be shared on the blog, including accounts from Dr. Fairchild’s trip to “The Isle of Singing Children,” and the attention getting, boiled papaya leaf preparation, that David & Alex both advocated. For now let’s start with this simple, and delicious breakfast papaya.

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“Papaya is a strictly acquired taste for many people, it seems, but I was lucky in my initial experiences with the fruit, for I at once very much liked Dr. Fairchild’s way of serving it when I stayed with him.” — Alex D. Hawkes
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Ripe Papaya

David Fairchild’s Breakfast Papaya

1     medium ripe papaya

2     tablespoons sugar

2     Key (or Persian) limes, sliced

Peel papaya, Scoop out seeds, slice into rather thin, bite-size pieces. In a large shallow bowl, arrange papaya pieces, sprinkle sugar over them. and refrigerate overnight. Serve with lime slices for breakfast. Serves four.

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Rainy day at “The Kampong”, thanks for visiting Sub Tropic Cookery.

 

Indonesian Recipes At Home In Florida – Tomatoes Javanese

“The marvelous and varied cuisine of far-off Indonesia offers many suggestions for us here in Florida. These recipes are quite unlike those of any other Eastern cookery – some Javanese dishes are frighteningly spicy-hot, for example. Yet I often use them in combination with good old American meals to excellent advantage.” – Alex D. Hawkes

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When is the last time you served tomatoes as a side? How about the carbon footprint of the fruits and veggies you enjoy? Were they grown locally? Sometimes these questions incite differing opinions about GMO this and that, and organic vs conventional banter. Is there a need to pay exorbitant prices for premium produce in Florida, or anywhere in our great country? Yes, on occasion, to satisfy some popular opinion. What does it take for more vegetable side dishes to appear at our tables? The lower the carbon footprint, the better off things will be, right?

“The marvelous and varied cuisine of far-off Indonesia offers many suggestions for us here in Florida. These recipes are quite unlike those of any other Eastern cookery – some Javanese dishes are frighteningly spicy-hot, for example. Yet I often use them in combination with good old American meals to excellent advantage.” — Alex D. Hawkes (1964)
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Editor’s Note: “Alex D. Hawkes is a writer, noted orchidologist, and specialist in the cookery of southern Florida. He makes “his home in Coconut Grove.” — Ruth Gray (1964)

The focal concern here, is noting that there’s a definite level of aloofness regarding overall awareness of, “The Sunshine State’s” agricultural prowess, particularly in the winter. When snow is falling in every American state, except in “The Tropics“, Florida, is proudly providing and endless bounty of tasty vegetable side dishes for the rest of the country. The aloofness is amongst Floridians, and the remainder of Americans as well. Become aware of how your local agricultural networks function, by visiting local farms, and purchasing produce directly from growers, and suppliers connected to the source. Visit farmer’s markets throughout the week, not just during the weekend. Plant a tree.

“Handsome rich-red tomatoes are big business with Florida farmers. During the springtime especially, these juicy vegetables are common and reasonably priced in our markets. The following recipe for Tomatoes Javanese is a quickie, requires only a few minutes” preparation, and is very popular with my family and friends. I serve Tomatoes Javanese with such things as charcoal broiled hamburgers, pot roast, and even fried pork chops or ham.” — Alex D. Hawkes (1964)

Florida, “The Sunshine State“, is primed for growing a variety of just about everything tropical, and a divine selection of vegetables, from parsnips, cucumbers, squash, chayote, watercress, and tomatoes, to name just a few. For Alex’s Tomatoes Javanese recipe, we prepared “Redland SweetTomatoes, grown by Pine Island Tomato Farm, in Homestead.

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TOMATOES JAVANESE

6 medium tomatoes, cut in wedges

2 medium onions, sliced thin, in rings

2 tablespoons peanut (or soy) oil

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon ground dried red pepper

In a heavy skillet, heat the oil and stir-fry the onion, with the salt, cumin, and dried red pepper, for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the tomato wedges and stir-fry 5 minutes. Serve either hot or chilled. Serves 4 to 6 persons.

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Indonesian Recipes At Home In Florida – Tomatoes Javanese – St. Petersburg Times – 1964-05-28 — Alex D. Hawkes

 

 

Take Full Advantage Of Kumquat Season – Preserved Kumquats

“The other day a good friend presented me with a marvelous quantity of beautiful fresh kumquats. These little citrus fruits are to be encountered in many good Florida markets now, too, and the enterprising cook should take full advantage of their availability while they are still on the trees. Perhaps you still have some left in your yard.” Alex D. Hawkes (1967)

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The fruits of being a Floridian. Kumquat, Citrus japonica, is part of the Rutaceae citrus family. “Fortunella is the name given to the kumquat genus in honor of Robert Fortune who in 1846 was the first person to import kumquats into Europe. The name “kumquat” is a synthesis of the Chinese words gam (金), meaning gold, + gwat (橘), a term for tangerines” (UF IFAS). These small, delicious, sweet, and tart, citrus fruits can be eaten whole and turned into a fine array of preserves. Not to be confused with Calamondin, another one of the small and magical citrus fruits that are to be enjoyed.

“The other day a good friend presented me with a marvelous quantity of beautiful fresh kumquats. These little citrus fruits are to be encountered in many good Florida markets now, too, and the enterprising cook should take full advantage of their availability while they are still on the trees. Perhaps you still have some left in your yard.” Alex D. Hawkes (1967)

Let’s discover the way Alex D. Hawkes explained and prepared kumquats in his 1967 article “Taking Full Advantage Of Kumquat Season”, for the St. Petersburg Times, in North Florida. Alex, a South Floridian, from a small, botanically lush neighborhood, known as Coconut Grove, in the City of Miami, facing the Biscayne Bay. But why was Hawkes writing for the St. Petersburg Times and The Lakeland Ledger, in the north of The Sunshine State? Mr. Hawkes was a botanist, and was involved with the Florida West Coast Bromeliad Society, that gathered in northern Florida. Alex also divided his time between Coconut Grove “The Tropics”, and Jamaica in the Caribbean, his second home. During his Jamaican getaways, he would submit his recipes by post to Jane Nickerson, Lakeland’s food editor. His last columns kept running for several weeks after his untimely 1977 death in Jamaica.

Alex was a devoted orchidologist and specimen collector, with a wide range of interests. Alex’s botanical adventures took him around the world, into the the jungles of Latin America, the Caribbean, and countless other places, which will be discovered through A.D. Hawkes’ recipes. When taking the larger view, then, it becomes clear that the very personal magic he’d bring to life in his small immaculate Coconut Grove kitchen, partook of a larger outside world, and might help explain why, after all these years, his recipes refuse to be contained. This is where Alex would test and adapt the recipes he collected from his botanizing adventures. Alex would go on to share these recipes via Florida’s newspapers as a food columnist, and through the cookbooks he authored, leading up to being cited by food writing heavyweights such as Cecily Brownstone, in her highly syndicated AP food column.

Alex D. Hawkes carved his path within various botanical circles related to orchids, bromeliads, ferns, palms and more. Alex established the South Florida Bromeliad Society (BSSF), alongside Nat DeLeon and Bob Wilson in 1959. Alex’s botanical connections around the state very well could have linked him up with the St. Petersburg Times paper, the rest is delicious. The BSSF still meets monthly at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (FTBG), in Coral Gables.

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“Wash the firm kumquats, and using a big darning needle, prick each fruit several times.” Alex D. Hawkes (1967)
“The vivid orange rind is piquant, yet edible, hence whole fresh Kumquats can be served as a very distinctive fresh accompaniment with any festive meal, from fish or fowl to roast red meats. Marmalades and jellies are also prepared from these attractive fruits, and when crystallized or preserved, kumquats are increasingly popular with many of us.” Alex D. Hawkes (1967)

Enjoy Alex’s recipe, while we add another book to his list of unpublished cookbooks. Was Hawkes pulling our leg when he mentioned he was writing a “Citrus Cookbook”? Nonetheless, Alex’s 4 published cookbooks, and his hundreds of newspaper columns for the Miami News, The Miami Herald, St. Petersburg Times, Lakeland Ledger, and The Jamaica Gleaner will satisfy anyone’s desire to explore the lovely world of citrus fruits, with the wide array of recipes Mr. Hawkes shared with his readers during his food writing career.

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FLETCHER’S PRESERVED KUMQUATS. Who was Fletcher, perhaps Alex’s nice friend that gave him the marvelous quantity of beautiful fresh kumquats?

FLETCHER’S PRESERVED KUMQUATS (MAKES A LOT)

2 quarts fresh kumquats

   Boiling Water

5 cups sugar

1 tablespoon lime (or lemon) juice

Wash the firm kumquats, and using a big darning needle, prick each fruit several times. Place fruit in a large heavy saucepan, add boiling water to cover. Simmer until the fruit is tender – (usually about 20 minutes). Remove kumquats from water with slotted spoon. Add sugar and lime (or lemon) juice to water, and bring to a boil, stirring often. Boil for five minutes, then return the kumquats, and cook them over very low heat until they are semi – transparent, usually about an hour. Allow kumquats to stand in syrup overnight. Next day, bring fruit and syrup back to the boiling point. Remove kumquats from syrup with slotted spoon. Pack them into hot sterilized jars. Cook syrup until thickened. Pour over, the kumquats. Seal the jars.

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“Allow kumquats to stand in syrup overnight. Next day, bring fruit and syrup back to the boiling point.” – Hawkes (1967)
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“As a decorative fruit when used fresh, the kumquat is very beautiful. In using the kumquat, as in other citrus fruits, the length of time and quantity of water to be used in extracting bitterness from peel varies with individual fruits; some requiring more and others less. This can only be regulated by testing the liquid and changing until palatable.” – Florida Tropical Cookbook – First Presbyterian Church of Miami (1912)
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We prepared Florida Kumquats from Dade City. Nature’s Sweet Tart An exciting new taste treat. Eat it all except the seeds. Sweet peel and tart pulp. Kumquat Growers, Inc. ~ Fresh From Florida