Indonesian Recipes At Home In Florida – Tomatoes Javanese

“The marvelous and varied cuisine of far-off Indonesia offers many suggestions for us here in Florida. These recipes are quite unlike those of any other Eastern cookery – some Javanese dishes are frighteningly spicy-hot, for example. Yet I often use them in combination with good old American meals to excellent advantage.” – Alex D. Hawkes

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When is the last time you served tomatoes as a side? How about the carbon footprint of the fruits and veggies you enjoy? Were they grown locally? Sometimes these questions incite differing opinions about GMO this and that, and organic vs conventional banter. Is there a need to pay exorbitant prices for premium produce in Florida, or anywhere in our great country? Yes, on occasion, to satisfy some popular opinion. What does it take for more vegetable side dishes to appear at our tables? The lower the carbon footprint, the better off things will be, right?

“The marvelous and varied cuisine of far-off Indonesia offers many suggestions for us here in Florida. These recipes are quite unlike those of any other Eastern cookery – some Javanese dishes are frighteningly spicy-hot, for example. Yet I often use them in combination with good old American meals to excellent advantage.” — Alex D. Hawkes (1964)
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Editor’s Note: “Alex D. Hawkes is a writer, noted orchidologist, and specialist in the cookery of southern Florida. He makes “his home in Coconut Grove.” — Ruth Gray (1964)

The focal concern here, is noting that there’s a definite level of aloofness regarding overall awareness of, “The Sunshine State’s” agricultural prowess, particularly in the winter. When snow is falling in every American state, except in “The Tropics“, Florida, is proudly providing and endless bounty of tasty vegetable side dishes for the rest of the country. The aloofness is amongst Floridians, and the remainder of Americans as well. Become aware of how your local agricultural networks function, by visiting local farms, and purchasing produce directly from growers, and suppliers connected to the source. Visit farmer’s markets throughout the week, not just during the weekend. Plant a tree.

“Handsome rich-red tomatoes are big business with Florida farmers. During the springtime especially, these juicy vegetables are common and reasonably priced in our markets. The following recipe for Tomatoes Javanese is a quickie, requires only a few minutes” preparation, and is very popular with my family and friends. I serve Tomatoes Javanese with such things as charcoal broiled hamburgers, pot roast, and even fried pork chops or ham.” — Alex D. Hawkes (1964)

Florida, “The Sunshine State“, is primed for growing a variety of just about everything tropical, and a divine selection of vegetables, from parsnips, cucumbers, squash, chayote, watercress, and tomatoes, to name just a few. For Alex’s Tomatoes Javanese recipe, we prepared “Redland SweetTomatoes, grown by Pine Island Tomato Farm, in Homestead.

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TOMATOES JAVANESE

6 medium tomatoes, cut in wedges

2 medium onions, sliced thin, in rings

2 tablespoons peanut (or soy) oil

½ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon ground dried red pepper

In a heavy skillet, heat the oil and stir-fry the onion, with the salt, cumin, and dried red pepper, for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the tomato wedges and stir-fry 5 minutes. Serve either hot or chilled. Serves 4 to 6 persons.

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Indonesian Recipes At Home In Florida – Tomatoes Javanese – St. Petersburg Times – 1964-05-28 — Alex D. Hawkes